Breaking Up with Corporate

Patty Deutsche: Creating the Stability You Desire

April 04, 2022 Patty Deutsche Season 1 Episode 17
Breaking Up with Corporate
Patty Deutsche: Creating the Stability You Desire
Show Notes Transcript

When Covid hit and gas demand plummeted,  Patty and hundreds of other colleagues lost their job.  Fortunately for her, she was able to take her decades of communications experience and create her company and gain the stability she craved.

Find the show notes and all the links from today's episode here.

Resources:  Want to know 7 things you can do today to make leaving corporate easier?  Grab it here!

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Jamie Stephens:

Okay, Patti, thank you so much for joining us here on breaking up with corporate, can you go ahead and introduce yourself to our guests and kind of give us a quick introduction of where you are now, and then we'll get into the backstory of kind of how you got here.

Patty Deutsch:

Yeah. Thanks for having me, Jamie. It's a pleasure to be here. My name is Patty Deutsch. And I am currently CEO and founder of volterra communications, which is a small communications firm that works with small and mid sized businesses to help them build, protect and improve their reputations. And that comes from a long line of working in corporate America and learning those lessons and now trying to teach others the same. That's awesome.

Jamie Stephens:

So what kind of roles were you in whenever you were in the corporate world, that world that gave you this kind of background that you're using now?

Patty Deutsch:

Communications of all sorts. So I started off in government relations, actually, as a lobbyist for a health care company. Then went into marketing for global consulting firm, corporate communications for Cisco Systems. There it global IT Communications Group. And then Public Affairs, which is Government and Public Affairs for Dow Chemical, and then most recently, in the oil and gas industry. So it's, it's running the gamut, you know, but always Communications has been at the heart of it.

Jamie Stephens:

Gotcha. So out of all of those, what would you say was probably your toughest communication job? Like, was there any major events that happened? You know, cuz I can think of like, oil and gas, I'm thinking like, you know, that could be a PR.

Patty Deutsch:

Yeah, sometimes. So, you know, part of my job was always crisis communications, and was yeah, you seen it all, then? Yeah. And I was with Dow Chemical, we had what was called emergency operation center. And we would train once a month, and in the seven years, I was there never did, we have to stand up that EOC is what it's called. And I had to talk to the media on several occasions about downsizing and that sort of thing, but never a crisis. And then when I went to the oil and gas industry, you can imagine that we weren't having things like explosions, you might have gas releases, or flaring. And in my first year, I think our emergency operations center got together 13 times in one year, and it's always a two in the morning, right, or four o'clock on Sunday morning, or, you know, just as you're going out to dinner. It's never while you're there at work. So I that was, that was definitely the most challenging. But if you're, if you're prepared, it makes it easier, you know, we were very good about having talking points. And you stick to those talking points, and you give, you know, the facts, and you wait until you have more to deliver that. So. It's not as stressful as it sounds, when you're prepared.

Jamie Stephens:

So that's interesting. Did you ever have, like a situation where you felt uncomfortable about the things that you had to present? Or the things that you were, like, prepared as talking points? Or has it always kind of felt okay, you know,

Patty Deutsch:

yeah, it's always felt okay. Because, I mean, I can tell you, what are three talking points, and almost any situation where it is, we trained for this, our employees are prepared, right, our number one concern at the moment is the safety of the employees and the community. And we are working with, you know, outside responders or, you know, other law enforcement agencies, what have you to find out the cause and, and mitigate it, and that, you know, you stick to those three, and it doesn't matter whether you had somebody die, fortunately, never on my watch, or a big explosion, those are always your three talking points. And, you know, you can give more as as you get more information, but

Jamie Stephens:

yeah, no, that's very comfortable about that. Yeah, no, there's not at all I just didn't know if it's like, no, the sea turtles will be fine, you know, where you're like, I'm gonna be like, Oh, I just don't

Patty Deutsch:

wanna it's funny that you say that because we in oil and gas, we also trained, you know, we had a big Fallout example, once a year that we went through, if something big were to happen, and they had somebody that they called Truth, who was sitting in another room that would call up and ask questions, you know, pretend they were from the community, or pretend that they were a reporter. or what have you. And you had to go through this simulation. And there was one time where somebody called, you know, pretending to be a community member and saying that they heard, you know, a beaver had been injured. And is the beaver okay? You know, and you have to say, you know, we've got the wildlife experts on site, and they're taking care of the animals. But, but what's the beavers name? And oh, my goodness, you know, I mean, I imagine a community member might do that, you know, yeah, that's a just kind of had to stick to, you know,

Jamie Stephens:

we never trained for this, trained for this.

Patty Deutsch:

We've got people on site that are taking care of the wildlife, we're doing everything we can, but our number one, you know, goal right now is to stop the oil spill, and to make sure, you know, our employees and our community, including the wildlife are all safe. And, you know, repeat, repeat.

Jamie Stephens:

So, do you carry those same three questions like into your own communications firm? And like, is that kind of the same basis of how you respond? Or have you tweaked that since leaving corporate?

Patty Deutsch:

Yeah, it's gonna depend on the industry, you know, if you're working with food products, their talking points might be a little bit different, or, you know, well, any industry, industrial is probably the same and thinking like water management, or waste management, they'd probably stick to the same kind of things. But, you know, a pharmaceutical company might have slightly different, you know, they will all say, it'll be in the same realm, you know, we're, we're looking into this, we are working with the authorities, you know, to find out how it happened. And we will let you know, you know, as we know, kind of thing. So,

Jamie Stephens:

yeah. So, whenever you decided it was time to leave corporate, like, how did you come to that decision after spending? It sounds like, a very good chunk of your career within the realm. So like, what was it that kind of made you decide to leave?

Patty Deutsch:

Um, set? Well, several things. I mean, I really enjoyed a long career in corporate and thought I would retire from that. And I think what finally got to me, was not being able to control you know, my own time. And, you know, in particular, having, you know, well, when you have management changes, and the bosses have different styles, the companies have different cultures. It throws wrenches into everything that you've been doing, you know, you could have built a great portfolio of communications, you know, tactics, and all of a sudden, you know, the focus shifts, and, you know, no, we don't really care about that. We don't want to do that anymore. And you're saying, But, wait, I've been working on this for six years, it's been incredibly successful. You should be doing this throughout the company. And you're saying no, and it was a little bit like, when I worked in Congress, many, many years ago, and every two years, you start over. And if the bill didn't go through, you start over, and it just felt like spinning wheels. So I started thinking, Maybe I should go out on my own. But that's scary. You know, when you're used to a salary, and benefits, and, you know, knowing that, you know, bonuses are coming and stock options, and all those sorts of things to all of a sudden, have none of that was terrifying.

Jamie Stephens:

So, how did you overcome that? How did you prepare for that, like being your reality?

Patty Deutsch:

Well, I'll be honest, COVID helped in several ways. First of all, I never thought I could work from home. I thought I didn't have the motivation. I probably go down and watch you know, the Ellen Show are soap operas, and you know, not doing my work Netflix and chill. Yeah, take long walks and, and when COVID hit and the refinery actually, you know, went to remote for all the administrative folks like me, I had to work from home. Alright, so all of a sudden I find myself on the computer eight hours a day and telling my boss I need a break and he goes, take take your walk when you need to take a walk. Don't worry about it. You know you're getting your work done. So that kind of trained me, you know, for, I think I can work at home, you know, I do have the motivation, I'm getting up in the morning and, and, and get things done. And then when they actually shut down the refinery, because gas demand plummeted during COVID, nobody was driving to work, right. And so they shut down and 750 of us lost our jobs. So that made the decision for me. But mentally, you know, I was already preparing. And so I would say within six weeks of the job ending, I had registered my company and gotten the business cards, and the logo and the website and all that kind of stuff. So it was pretty easy, then to just flip the switch.

Jamie Stephens:

That's amazing. So I want to go back to what you said about like, proving it to yourself that you could do it. Is there any? Like, how did you set yourself up for success to be able to, like, make that transition? I mean, I think we're probably more clear on that now than we've ever been, you know, working from home these last couple of years, and just kind of proving that to ourselves. But is there anything that you did specifically to kind of set yourself up to, even when you were at your corporate job, just kind of those habits of like, yeah, I can do this, this is this is going to be okay.

Patty Deutsch:

And I would say my networking has been number one in not only every job I've had, but in the job I'm doing now. Fortunately, that was part of my jobs, you know, doing Community Relations and Outreach and working with elected officials and that sort of thing. But once I went off on my own, I have that network. Right. So it was kind of a saving grace. Because I could reach out to literally 100 people and say, you know, started my own business, here's what I'm doing. You know, does your company need help? If not, can you introduce me to some folks that you think might, you know, need my services? And, and even if that didn't result in business, it kept me going. Right. You know, it kept kept the mind sharp. It kept me getting up in the morning and, and working hard.

Jamie Stephens:

Awesome. So how long have you had your communications firm now?

Patty Deutsch:

15 months? Wow. Just

Jamie Stephens:

a little over a year. Yeah. Congratulations. Thank you exciting. And so you also have a podcast? Is that correct?

Patty Deutsch:

I do. That was one of the things while clients were not pouring in yet. And I thought I need to, I need to learn some new skills. And I'm not the most high tech person, you know, what communications is, is pretty low tech. It's talking, it's writing. Yes, it's social media and that sort of thing. But you know, I had the time. And so I took a course on how to create a podcast. And I had always had an idea in my mind that I would like to talk about good news. We're also tired of bad news and negativity in the world. And we just get bombarded with all that. And I wish there was somewhere that you could start your day with a funny story, a clean joke, an interview with somebody who inspired you. And so that's what I did. It's called your daily chocolate. Because just a little piece of chocolate can make you happy. It has nothing to do with chocolate. But, but it's been a lot of fun that launched in January. Yeah.

Jamie Stephens:

So what would you say like has been your biggest growth opportunity from that? Like stretching yourself to learn something new? Would it be the tech or have you noticed other things that have come up in the process?

Patty Deutsch:

Oh, my gosh, well, the tech is definitely the toughest part for me. And so I've outsourced that, Oh, I found a really talented producer. And he, I do all the interviews, you know, and schedule them and that sort of thing. And then I just send it to him. He edits. He does the show notes. He publishes it, you know, and he's just been a godsend, so I don't really have to worry about that. And I'll admit, I have my 22 year old nephew doing all my Instagram wasn't able to figure that out. But I'm learning

Jamie Stephens:

it's all good.

Patty Deutsch:

And I figured it's good for him. And it's just been interesting. Just learning this whole industry and reaching out to people to be you know, guests on the podcast and how easily some people say yes

Jamie Stephens:

You know, I found that really surprising myself. I was just yeah, I really thought when I got started, I would be doing more like solo interview or not solo interviews, but solo episodes and just kind of talking to the mic myself, right. And I've actually found it way easier to talk, you know, to other people, but it really has not been challenging to get people to come on the show, which is kind of like a big fear is something that kept me kind of paralyzed for a while. I'm like, yeah, that talked who would wanted to, you know, but it's yeah, it's, that's awesome. I'm glad that you've had a similar response. Yeah.

Patty Deutsch:

Well, I've even like reached out to some celebrity types. Right, and was shocked to actually hear back. And they said, Oh, you know, once you have a few under your belt, contact us, you know, maybe in the spring, we'd love to do it. Like, huh. Right.

Jamie Stephens:

I love that. So how are you balancing that with your communications business? Now? Is it up to speed after a year? Or is it still kind of you're looking for? Or I'm sure you're always looking for clients and that sort of thing? But like, how is that whole process going for you.

Patty Deutsch:

And it definitely took longer than I thought to kind of get those clients coming in. And I thought with my network, that it would be really easy, but it was COVID. Right. And so people were worried about their budgets, or they were, you know, laying people off, and they didn't want to bring on a contractor. And so it wasn't until I aligned myself actually with a PR firm out of Atlanta. And they brought me in as a consultant, and I now am working on four or five of their clients. So that's, I won't say it's keeping me busy full time. But it's enough that, you know, bills are being paid. And it gives me time to do the podcast as well. So it's been a really kind of a nice balance.

Jamie Stephens:

Yeah. Do you find yourself taking more walks? Are you just like going all in?

Patty Deutsch:

I'm a fairweather Walker. So you know when it's sunny? And between 60 and 75 degrees? Absolutely. I'm out there. And I've got several, you know, trails around my house that I can easily hop on. So where are you?

Jamie Stephens:

Where are you located up?

Patty Deutsch:

I'm in the Bay Area, California. Oh, nice. Yeah, yeah. So we do have nicer weather. Most of the time, I should be out there walking more.

Jamie Stephens:

Yeah, oh, it'll it'll come with balance, I think is like, what I have found as as I can kind of, like breathe a little bit after I kind of master one skill. And I like master as a stretch at this point. But like, once I feel comfortable with kind of where I'm at, you know, skill wise, it's like, I can take another deep breath. And you know, it's just like, there's so much constant learning and growing and pushing yourself. And

Patty Deutsch:

I think that's really important. You know, and, I mean, I've, like, my career is probably coming to an end in the next, you know, five to seven years. But I think it's important to constantly be learning. One of the things that I also did during this kind of transition time, as I went through training to become a certified Board of Director for Public and private companies. I've always served on like nonprofits and civic organizations and served on their boards. But I thought, that's a whole nother career that you can actually have is to sit on a public company board, you know, you get paid, you're not, you're working maybe two or 300 hours a year. And it's exciting, you know, you you're involved in real critical business decisions and that sort of thing, but it doesn't take up a whole lot of time. And so now I'm certified. And, you know, it's not a requirement to be on a board. But it certainly helps. And I think that learning, learning all about governance and audits and, you know, social ESG, environment, social and governance, and, you know, all the things that boards deal with was kind of mind expanding.

Jamie Stephens:

Yeah, I've never, I've never even like, wander down that path. Like, that's not I wouldn't even have the first clue on how to even like, go about being on a board or, you know, how they select people or how you, you know, like all of these things, it's like, Xur did they do applications for board members? Or do they just choose people you know, it's that's an interesting,

Patty Deutsch:

and yet you'd probably have the skills that they are looking for, you know, they want somebody with real experience. They're not they're not always just hiring CEOs and CFOs you know, they want somebody who's got some communication or some marketing background or who understands research or HR, you know that all the different things that we deal with in corporate world are skills that they're looking for on a board?

Jamie Stephens:

That's interesting. What would your dream, like dream board be? Like, if you could just choose any company to like, be like, Oh, God on the board of x, what would that be?

Patty Deutsch:

You know, it would probably be like Callaway golf. I'm a big golfer, I love their equipment. You know, it would give me another reason to play that or, like a travel company,

Jamie Stephens:

maybe? Oh, see, I could get on board with that one, or check off or not so much. Oh, yeah. Your daily check company? Yeah, I could do that, too. Yeah, that sounds really fun. Awesome. Well, tell me about something that you had to really kind of overcome to I, you know, a lot of the focus of what I want to talk about here is around like mindset, like mindset, growth and mindset, kind of things that you had to do to get here. Is there like some sort of mantra that you kind of use to push you through the tough times? Or, you know, like, what is something that you kind of fall back on, in over like the last 12 months?

Patty Deutsch:

Well, just the last 12 months. I mean, I learned so much in corporate jobs, that, you know, I think I'm a pretty smart person, I'm motivated. And you tend to think, you know, hard work will pay off, right. And if you do the job, well, they'll notice you. And I learned a long time ago. And actually, there's one instance that comes to mind, I had a great idea. And I wrote it up on my computer, and I printed it out. And I put a sticky note on it and gave it to my boss. And I said, you know, I think the CEO might be interested in this idea. And he didn't say anything to me. But he took off the sticky note. And he presented it to the CEO as his idea. And that was the first time that I thought, you know, from now on, no sticky notes, you know, if I'm going to write something, I'm going to write it on a piece of paper, so he can't take it off. And I've learned that you really have to take ownership of your career. Nobody's going to do it for you. And so if you do something great, make sure people know about it. Don't you don't have to, you know, I don't know if it's a woman thing or not. But you don't have to feel like if I say something I'm bragging, you're really not you're letting people know, something great has happened. And so that has certainly helped me in starting a business because right, nobody's going to go out and say, you know, oh, you need to hire Patti? Because she's wonderful. I kind of have to do it myself. Right? Here are the types of here's the types of things that I've helped companies do. Here's what I can do for your company. And so I have, I'm in the self promotion business, which is really uncomfortable. You know, for I think a lot of women but But I learned that early on that nobody, unless you have a really great boss, nobody's gonna do that for you.

Jamie Stephens:

Yeah, I mean, you have to be your own biggest cheerleader, or you do. I mean, you're just setting yourself up for failure. Yeah, yeah. I mean, I mean, honestly. Sorry, go ahead.

Patty Deutsch:

No, I also learned to speak up. And I'm not a shy person. But if I'm in a room with a lot of people that are really smart about a certain industry, or technology or whatever, I don't necessarily ask all the questions. But I learned in one meeting in particular, they were using an acronym and I didn't know what it was. And so I finally said, I'm sorry, you know, I don't know what that stands for. I know I'm new at this, but can you? And afterwards, I had three or four people come up and go, Oh, my gosh, thank you so much for asking that. I didn't know what they're talking about, either.

Jamie Stephens:

Yes, I feel that I think that was my first like waterfall chart that I ever saw, like trying to like for Financials. I'm like, I am not certain what's going on here. Somebody dumb it down for me.

Patty Deutsch:

Well, I tend to think, Okay, I'm gonna write this down. I'll go find out later. But there's a lot of people in that room that need that same information, you know, so that that gave me kind of motivation to ask a lot of questions in the future. And that ended up being something that you know, when I was was invited to be on a board, they said, you know, Patti asks really good questions, you know, the type that, you know, people need to know. And that we aren't necessarily thinking of so

Jamie Stephens:

yeah, and that wouldn't have come about if you wouldn't have just kind of pushed your ego aside and being uncomfortable and all of those things and just being like, Okay, wait a second, you know, yeah. So, I love that. Yeah. So tell me, what is your favorite thing of what you're doing these days? Like, out of the podcast out of your business out of your life? The whole the whole bit? Like, how? What is it that you're loving? In this season?

Patty Deutsch:

Oh, I love a lot. I mean, I honestly do. I love the growing of the business and the the clients that I'm getting to work on. I love to write. And so I just had an article that I wrote for the Georgia Forestry Association of all things. And it ended up as their cover story. It just came out a couple days ago. And that surprised me because I thought it was just gonna be Yeah. So that's always exciting. The podcast, I'm, I'm loving doing it, because every now and then somebody comes up and goes, Oh, my gosh, I listened to you know that your episode with the photographer? What an incredible person or, you know, oh, you had me laughing so hard with, you know, your Italian surprise story. And I just, you know, people are listening, and it's making them happy. So that's great. And then on a more personal note, I'm in the process of leaving California and building a house in Tennessee. And that's really exciting. I mean, it's like, my dream lot. The dream home. I'm meeting the neighbors, I'm having so much fun planning and, and making that happen. So there's a lot going on, that I'm excited about.

Jamie Stephens:

are you originally from Tennessee, and are like, where did it come from just because you love the Smoky Mountains,

Patty Deutsch:

California born and raised. And things are getting a little crazy out here. And so I was starting to look at somewhere that's more affordable, that has mild four seasons, that's, you know, kind of conservative, which California is not, you know, low taxes, all those things. And I looked at Idaho, wasn't crazy about it. I wanted to be in the mountains a little bit. Looked at Tennessee and and North Carolina, and this area outside of Chattanooga just spoke to me. So and I found the right,

Jamie Stephens:

lots of beautiful area around there.

Patty Deutsch:

It's gorgeous.

Jamie Stephens:

Yeah. That's nice. So when you were deciding, like after you were laid off, I'm going to go back to that for a minute. Because I think a lot of people have questions around kind of that transition period. You know, not everybody is like, has this long career to kind of call back on and, and just say, Okay, well, this is clearly what I'm going to do. Was there ever a time when you consider doing anything else other than communications, like, whenever you got that notice?

Patty Deutsch:

Well, I mean, communications is my skill set. So whatever I would have been doing would have been around that, but not necessarily starting my own business. But I did go through like before the company shut down, and we all lost our jobs. You know, I was getting that itch to do something, and like I said, was too scared to go off on my own. And I went through sort of a career exploration fellowship that my university offered. And they put into these groups. And we kinda had to go through these work, workbooks, it was all virtual before, things were even virtual. Until we were, you know, all over the, I think everybody was in California, but not necessarily same areas. But there was an engineer, and there was a bio chemist, and there was an environmental lawyer or something. So four or five of us all different areas. And we went through, everybody was itchy, you know, wanting to change careers, but not knowing how to do it. And, you know, I think there was a teacher and he wanted to become a physicist, and it's like, wow, that's a big change. But, you know, so we explored and part of that was, like sending out a survey to the people who knew us really well, professionally, you know, what are Patti's top skills? If you were if you were to put Patty in another profession, where do you think that would be? And to see what people think of you and you know, it was kind of anonymous, although I you know, You do get the results back. It was really interesting. You know, a lot of people thought I should be in politics. You know, some, some people said, you know, she shouldn't be an anchor person, you know, on TV, I think that ship has sailed, but, you know,

Jamie Stephens:

I don't want those hours.

Patty Deutsch:

I know. You know, they pointed out things that I didn't necessarily think of as skills, you know, and one of them was like, we were talking, you know, Patti asks great questions. Yeah. You know, she gets to the heart of things. And, and so that helped, you know, and of the three things that came out of, you know, here's what people have said, here's, here's what resonates with you, you know, what fits into your the next stage of life that you want to do? One of them was start your own company. I think the other one was, you know, joiner, do PR for, you know, like a golf or travel company, you know, but I'd have to find those in the area. But I thought, you know, it was so strong, that, you know, Patti should have her own firm, that I thought that's, that's worth trying. So I think, without that, I probably would have been more hesitant. But with so many people saying, she's got these skills, she's got this strength, you know, this is what she should be doing. Okay, I'm going to try it. And if I fail, I can go back to corporate. Right? Yeah, you know, you're never locked out. You know, in fact, they might say, oh, you know, interesting that you tried it on your own for a year or so? What new skills did you pick up? So yeah.

Jamie Stephens:

So was that vulnerable to send that out to your colleagues? And? I mean, I could just, did you send it to anybody that you were like currently working with? Or was it all like previous kind of coworkers and colleagues and stuff?

Patty Deutsch:

Um, no. Well, I sent, they were current, I didn't send it to like my boss, I didn't want him to know, I was thinking of leaving. But I was chair of a board for a civic organization size, sent it to that executive director, because I knew that she would also, you know, keep it in confidence. There was a contract company that we worked with, and their business development guy had become a golfing buddy. And I sent it to him, because he kind of knew me both personally and professionally. You know, my best friend who has seen me in the ups and downs of several different jobs, and knows what I can do. And so I mean, I think I sent it to six or seven people. And they all replied, and I thought, oh, okay, well, that's good. Yeah, I thought maybe I'd get three back. But yeah.

Jamie Stephens:

Well, that just means that they're excited to be able to share with you it sounds like I mean, that's not a it's not a typical survey response. 100%. Right. Like, maybe two of these people will respond. Right. That's what I was thinking. Yeah, no, that's really cool. So is there anything else as we kind of wrap up here? Is there anything else that you want to share for somebody who might just be starting on this path? Or just now kind of looking at, like, what else is out there? Kind of? What might I be able to do? Is there any, like tips or recommendations you would give someone in that position?

Patty Deutsch:

Oh, gosh. things, you know, things have changed so much over 20 or 30 years. I think it's easier and harder to find new jobs nowadays. I mean, everything's online, you know, but it's also you can send out your resume and never hear back. And you know, that and that can be a challenge. So I would just say, you know, know, your skill set well, and how it translates to whatever it is you want to do next, you know, if you want to go from, you know, being head of HR for, you know, Nestle, to being a golf pro. You know, you've got to figure out how but what you've done in the past is going to help you in the new job and make sure that your new employer understands how those translate. I've seen a lot of resumes for people that it doesn't spell that out, you know, it, they want you to figure out what they've done, and how that's applicable. And so, you know, just be really flexible with that. And, boy, use your network. You know, that is so important as you transition not only to, you know, find a new opportunities, but for those people who know you well, to keep supporting you. Not financially, but you know, mentally. Yeah, as things could take longer than you think. Yeah, they always do.

Jamie Stephens:

They always do. It's like building a house. You know, it's like whatever timeline you think you have. Go ahead. But yeah. 50 75% your your it's not getting done on the date. Yeah. That's funny. All right. Well, Patti, where can people find you if they want to learn more about your company more about your podcast, all of those things?

Patty Deutsch:

Yeah. So the name of my company is Volterra communications. And you can go to Volterra comms.com. And that's VTOL te R Ra, CE, O M M s.com. And that's got all my information about the services that I provide there. And then my podcast is your daily chocolate. You can go to your daily chocolate.com or on Instagram, it's your daily chocolate podcast. So lots lots of ways to find me.

Jamie Stephens:

Awesome. Well, thank you so much for your time today.

Patty Deutsch:

Absolutely. This was fun. Thanks for having me, Jamie.

Jamie Stephens:

Yeah, let me go ahead and stop recording here.